Wednesday, June 03, 2009

Eli in the Manger

It's almost enough to get one started on Christmas carols! Wanted to show you Eli's favorite spot to enjoy his breakfast, surrounded by his bestest friends. Doesn't get too excited about things, this one. He just lounges while everyone else gathers round in his glow. Chomp, chomp, chomp. He lazily chews his cud. He is a cheeky monkey, our Eli.

Also wanted to report in and show you my Navajo-plied yarn from last night. Stayed up too late finishing it, but how nice to sit and spin once in a blue moon. The skein is soaking now - I hope some of that overply comes out in the hot water. The first three or four yards were terrible, so I cut that off and used it for skein ties. Don't tell, 'k? So, what can I make with 136 yards of a worsted weight stripey, feltable yarn?

It's getting hot all of a sudden. Like the weatherman looked up at the calendar and said, "good grief, it's June! Bring on the 90s!" Tomorrow I'm installing two more fans in the barn stalls to keep the alpacas as cool as can be. We have a sprinkler system, but on humid days it doesn't do much good at all. The breeze, however, is indespensible.

Hey, does anyone want to skirt fleece on Saturday? I'm thinking we need to just address these last couple of fleeces and be ready to ship off the fiber. If you're available in the morning, before it gets too toasty outside, let me know and we'll play with fiber!

13 comments:

  1. what is "skirting fleece"?

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  2. Sorry, Sandy - you asked this before...

    Skirting is when we lay the fleece out on a screen and remove all the coarse fiber, short second cuts, grass and any other debris. If it's really clean when we send it to the processor, it's clean when it comes back as roving or yarn. It's a little time consuming (depending on the fleece) but it's fun to have your hands in all that fiber. After some experience, the job is easier as your hands learn to tell the difference between super soft, kind of soft, and not soft enough.

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  3. I LOVE Eli! And I LOVE your Navaho plied yarn! And I LOVE skirting fleece! So sorry I can't come; have some fiber fun without me...

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  4. Oh my goodness. That is so cute. It reminds me of when my daughter sits in her toy box to play with her toys. I tell her, "Don't sit where you eat!" lol Such an adorable picture.

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  5. Awwwhhhh! Sweet little one!

    What time Saturday morning? I will have to coordinate the car with Pina. But, yes! :)

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  6. Oh and your yarn is just beautiful!!!!!!

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  7. Eli is great! How funny. Your yarn is gorgeous! I saw it in person today and it is as soft as it is pretty! Great job, Cindy.

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  8. Too cute! I absolutely LOVE this picture! And yes, I love your yarn, too! Oh what will you make with that beautiful yarn? Hmm... It sure would make a lovely lap throw or scarf. :o)

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  9. Your yarn is gorgeous!
    That Eli is a mess, isn't he!

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  10. Beautiful yarn! I love to navajo ply, it makes such a nice round yarn. What about a baby shrug out of that, or a baby hat and bootie set? I bet you could get a small purse and I-pod case out of that too.

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  11. new question: do you shear the alpaca like you do sheep? if not, how do you get it? am i asking the dumbest questions of anyone? next shearing, can i help clean fleece? or do you have to be able to stand?

    i wish dh would get drivable soon so i can come visit and get eggs and meet you and touch critters.

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  12. There is a very specialized way my friends shear alpacas, and they have a professional and an assistant do the deed, with lots of helpers. Here's the link to my post on our alpaca shearing and a video of the process:
    http://tinyurl.com/o8pdrb

    And, we can use lots of help cleaning fleece - lots of it is done sitting. That would be great!

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  13. goodie, i get to be productive!!!

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